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Cremation

Cremation is the burning (or combustion) of a deceased body to turn it into human ashes.
The practice of cremation is now commonplace around the world and can occur prior or after a funeral service in which family and friends celebrate the passing of a loved one.
Cremations usually take place at a crematorium via the use of a cremation chamber.

Cremation Ashes

Cremation ashes are what is leftover after the body has been exposed to high temperatures within the cremation chamber and resembles fragments of human bone that are then crushed (using a cremulator) further until they resemble a sand like texture.

What Do Cremation Ashes Look Like

Cremated ashes have a sand like texture once they have been through the complete process.

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  1. Cremation
  2. Direct Cremation
  3. Cremation Process
  4. Cremation Cost
  5. Cremation Statistics
  6. Water Cremation
  7. Cremation vs Burial

Cremation Chamber

Cremation ashes are what is leftover after the body has been exposed to high temperatures within the cremation chamber and resembles fragments of human bone that are then crushed (using a cremulator) further until they resemble a sand like texture.

What Temperature Does The Cremation Chamber Reach?

The cremation chamber reaches temperatures in excess of 800°C (1472 F)

Cremation Alternatives

The main alternative to cremation in the UK is burial, a new technique on the rise is resomation, or water cremation, read below for more information.

Religious Views on Cremation

Some religions do not cremate, we have identified those below as aswell as those religions who do condone its practice.

Christianity

Most of the Christian religion accepts and practices cremation, although burial has historically been a preferred method

Mulim

Islam and Muslims strictly forbid cremation due to post death rituals with the body

Jewish /Judaism

Most are strongly against cremation due to their belief of resurrection of the body

Hindu

widely practised and accepted

Buddhism

widely practised and accepted

Sikhism

widely practised and accepted

Jainism

widely practised and accepted

Pet Cremation

Pet cremation is a rising trend for pet owners to give a final farewell to their pets.
Pet owners can find crematoriums dedicated specifically to pets to discuss their needs. We have provided a list of pet cremation providers to help your search.

The general process is the same as a human cremation and you will have the choice to take the ashes away or allow the crematorium to spread the ashes i n their garden of remembrance. More info can be found on our pet cremation page

Glossary

Cremulator – device that the remains are placed inside directly out of the chamber. The device grinds up the left over bones and turns them from large lumps into a sand like texture
Crematorium/Crematoria – the venue in which a cremation takes place
Cremation Chamber – the vessel in which the body and coffin enter to actually be cremated
Columbarium – a place where ashes can be stored, a vault like building or container for ashes.
Direct cremation – is a more affordable way to say goodbye to a loved one. There typically is no service and the cremation is unattended with the ashes being delivered to the family after the cremation.
Resomation – a new type of cremation which uses water instead of direct heat.
Pet cremation – cremation but for pets

Further Reading

Direct Cremation Guide

Step by Step Cremation Process

The Cost of Cremation

Cremation statistics in the UK

Water Cremation, the new norm.

Cremation vs Burial Comparison